How to install and change color of Sardi icons in Linux

How to install and change color of Sardi icons in Linux


Hi. In this video I’m going to show you how to download, install, use, and customize the Sardi icons in Linux. Now, the Sardi icons are a really great icon set in my opinion because they look very unique, they’re very extensive (cover many apps) and they’re very customizable, meaning that you can change the color of them for example. However, the documentation for them isn’t totally straightforward and installation is uhh… Documentation is a bit scattered and the installation instructions isn’t totally straightforward. So that’s why I’m going to show you in this video how to install and customize them, for anyone who might have trouble with it like I did for the first time. So what you’re gonna want to do is, in your browser-of-choice, search for “Sardi icons”, go to the official GitHub repo. And here is the official documentation. As you can see it’s quite long, there’s a lot of stuff. Just go get the source files to download from SourceForge. Click ‘Download’ for the latest version and the download will start shortly. Alright and it finished downloading so let’s go check it out. All right here it is. Extract the tar file and it’s loading archive, this just might take a while given that the icon set is quite big and expansive so it might just take a while. And once it’s done extracting, I’ll show you where to put the folders in the correct location so that you can easily choose the icons from your GUI. Just give it a moment. All right so just extract. (yep sure) OK you’ve extracted the files here. You can go ahead and delete this now that you’re done with it. Here are all of the separate Sardi icon types. So what we’re going to want to do to install this is, we’re going to want to put them in the correct location. So what is that location? Well, it depends on whether you’re using Gnome or KDE. For Gnome, it’s recommended that you put them in the .icons folder in home. So for example if you hit ctrl H in your file manager, you should see all the hidden folders, including your .icons folder, and this is typically where you would put the icons folder for Sardi. However, I found that that doesn’t work on KDE. So for KDE you have two other options. If you just want the icons to be visible to your account only, your user, you put them in .local/share/icons. So over here you’d go to .local/share/icons, if you just want them to be visible to your user. If you want them to be visible to ALL users, you’d put it in /usr/share/icons. So you would go… /usr/share/icons. This is for global icon themes that all users will see, which requires sudo privileges to install. So for this video, I’m just going to install them in .local/share/icons (cause that’s easier). Let’s go to .local/share/icons. And just go back to our Sardi icons, and what we’re going to want to do is just move all of these icons into .local/share/icons. That’s it, it’s installed (hopefully). So now to use the icons, just select them from your GUI, normal way you would; on KDE in System Settings (or whatever the Gnome equivalent is). Let’s go check out do we have the Sardi icons installed? Yes we have! So as you can see over here, here are all of the Sardi icons that we installed. Let’s apply some of them and just see what they look like. Okay so here we have one of the default Sardi themes; it’s quite unique looking, very circle-y, and what does the folders look like? Yeah, so that’s quite interesting. What other Sardi icons do we have? There are lots of variations, which is quite nice. We have Sardi Flat Colora for example. Yeah, once again, quite unique looking. You can also see some example file types up here I have, just to show you what these look like under Sardi icons. You have a HTML file, Java file, PowerPoint, Python file etc. So that’s quite unique looking. And my final one, one of my favorites, is Sardi Ghost Flexible, which by default is everything white (which can look quite nice). Oh, and you can change the icon in the Application Launcher on KDE to use, for example, the Sardi icons. So if I search for Kubuntu, I’ll use the built-in Sardi-provided icon. As you can see, pretty much all of the icons have changed color. That’s how extensive the icons set are. So that’s how to install the Sardi icons, but now what about changing color? Well I’ll show you how to do that. Just one second… (closing notifications app). So to change the color of the Sardi icons, there’s a provided script. Go back to the Sardi folder (in .local/share/icons). I’m going to use the Sardi Ghost Flexible for this example. As you can see in here, there’s a `change-color` script; Open that with your text-editor-of- choice. And over here it has instructions on how to change the colors. You should read all the instructions in your own time, but the basic gist of it is: you want to copy-paste this icon folder so to create a copy (never work original). And then basically it uses hex codes. So the old color here is ffffff (which is ‘white’ for everything), and the new color is whatever color you want it to be. So let’s show you how to do this. Let’s copy the folder and paste it somewhere else for now. And let’s change the color to, ooh I don’t know, what color do we want? Let’s see, what would be a good wallpaper to display the color on… (picking a nice wallpaper)… Right, blue! Let’s create a blue icon set. So let’s rename the folder first to Blue, and open it up. Once again, open the change-color script with a text editor. Alright so, the instructions are over here, “how to proceed”; copy paste the folder, change the name of the folder if you know what color you will use already, and change the name of your new icon theme inside the `index.theme` file, which is over here. Open that up again with your text editor, and change the name over here. So we decided that we’re gonna call this ‘Blue’, so change the name to whatever-‘Blue’. And that’s all you should have to change in this file. Now over here, you have to enter in the hex code of the new color you want. They have some recommendations for tools you can use to pick the hex code. Every desktop environment have their own tools; GPick is apparently one for Gnome. Since I’m on KDE, I’ll just use the built-in KDE color- picker-widget. So let me just ‘Unlock Widgets’… and I will ‘Add Widgets’. Just search for the color-picker. I can just ‘Lock Widgets’ now. So now I said I wanted blue, so let me pick… yeah, this blue looks okay. Alright, there we go… So there’s all the hex codes for my color, and I’ll just select it over here. And now I’m going to replace this new color with the hex code for the color I just chose (blue). Now, the final step is that we have to run this `change-color` script in order to actually change the color of all the icons. So just before I proceed any further, let’s look at what the color of the icons are already; as you can see, here are all the icons: they’re all white. And now, after running the script, they will change color. Open up a terminal in this directory, and you can see up there the `change-color` script, and just run that. This may take a few minutes because there are many, many icons to change, so just give it some time. Alright, it seems to have been updated. So now let’s go back and look at those icons again… and yes! As you can see, all the colors have changed to blue. Alright! So now… so now to install and use this icon set, we just have to move it back to the location we were using before. So we were using .local/share/icons, so now just move our new folder into .local/share/icons. And now let’s see if we can finally use the icons, here’s the moment of truth… And yep! There you can see, we have it! The new blue customization we created. Let’s ‘Apply’… And there you go. As you can see, the color of all the icons have changed to blue; looks quite nice 🙂 That is in a nutshell how to install, use, and customize the color of the Sardi icons on Linux. On this particular version I was using KDE, but the steps are pretty similar for Gnome. Let’s just do one more example (just so you can get a feel for it). Let’s see… what would be another good wallpaper? (picking a wallpaper) Let’s try another color; let’s try pink, let’s create pink icons. So just a run-down; so you just have to go find the Sardi icon folder you’re looking for… (.local/share/icons) Ghost Flexible. Copy the folder. Paste the folder. Rename the folder to whatever color you wanna use. We’re gonna do pink so let’s do ‘Pink’. Open up. Rename the icon set in the `index.theme`. We said pink so we’re going to do ‘Pink’. Open up the `change-color` script. Change color for `newcolor`. You don’t have to worry about any other lines in this script, this is just where it changes all the colors. The only line you have to care about is this line, `newcolor`. So let’s select pink, we said we wanted pink… There we go, there’s my pink. Get the hex code for it. Replace newcolor with your color. Close the files. Open a terminal in the directory. Run the `change-color` script. Wait for it to do its magic. By the way, if you enjoyed the Sardi icons, feel free to give the developers a star on their GitHub repo and maybe leave some feedback. Let them know what you like and if you want to request any icons, there’s instructions on how to do that on the page. Just for a sanity check, you can check that the colors have changed. And yes, you can see, the color has changed. And the final step, move this into the correct location so you can use it. Oops, one sec, that’s not what I wanted to do. Yup, there we go. And then, finally, select your icons from the system settings as normal. There’s our pink. And there you go! All of the icon colors have changed to pink. There you have it, it’s as simple as that. Oh! And you can change the color of not just the Sardi Ghost Flexbile. Some of the other icons can also be changed as well. so if I look at Sardi, (does this one have? no, not here. Maybe Colora?) Yep, so there’s also a `change-color` script here in Sardi Colora. So you can change the color for quite a few of the Sardi icons. Thanks for watching and if you have any questions, leave them in the comments. Have fun experimenting!

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